Road to Smart Perception

Road to Smart Perception

HSI Camera Fuses Snapshot and Linescan Benefits

The hyperspectral imaging (HSI) camera snapscan combines a good signal to noise ratio with spatial and spectral resolution advantages of linescan hyperspectral imaging technology and the ability to acquire data-sets as easily as with a snapshot camera.

Figure 1 | Full view of the datacubes (left). Zoom over a region-of-interest (middle). Blue and red spectra corresponding to the blue and red selection on the left-hand figures (right). Displayed spectra are an average over a 5x5 region with the corresponding standard deviation displayed in transparency. Datasets are a hand (a-c), a blood smear (d-f) and pills (g-l). (Bild: Imec vzw)

Figure 1 | Full view of the datacubes (left). Zoom over a region-of-interest (middle). Blue and red spectra corresponding to the blue and red selection on the left-hand figures (right). Displayed spectra are an average over a 5×5 region with the corresponding standard deviation displayed in transparency. Datasets are a hand (a-c), a blood smear (d-f) and pills (g-l). (Bild: Imec vzw)

Intelligent robotics are bound to transform society – and smart perception is key to realizing that. By 2040, we’ll have micro-sized cameras looking at every angle, depth, mode or change in a scene, and reporting back with all (and only) relevant info. However, for smart perception to become a reality, new technologies are needed – such as mass-produced, single-chip, high-quality hyperspectral vision technology and hyperspectral cameras offering high resolution and fast image capturing and processing capabilities. Such innovations will create new opportunities for hyperspectral imaging in domains such as life sciences, medical applications and diagnostics, which are not yet served by today’s solutions. Tomorrow’s smart perceptive systems will rely on smart cameras that integrate various viewing and sensing modalities into a single compact and cheap system. Cameras, for instance, that recognize and scan a surface via radar, look underneath with an x-ray component, analyze material through a hyperspectral view, and that have the intelligence to acquire and merge various data streams into the most relevant view for the user. Hyperspectral cameras will be at the basis of this. However, today’s hyperspectral cameras are expensive and not user friendly, thus limiting their use. To overcome that, a hyperspectral imaging solution has been developed that uses optical filters on top of CMOS image sensors, resulting in a compact, cost-efficient and fast hyperspectral camera.

The best of two worlds

Until now, no hyperspectral technique was able to capture entire scenes at once with fair levels of spatial and spectral resolution. To fill that gap, Snapscan was developed: a novel, patent-pending hyperspectral camera combining the best of both linescan and snapshot imaging. Linescan hyperspectral cameras scan scenes line per line. They are ideal for applications requiring high spatial and spectral resolution – with scenes passing by the camera, such as aerial observation or food sorting. However, for inspection cameras in robots, free-flying drones, movement-activated security cameras or real-time imaging during surgery, you need an entire 3D multispectral image being sensed at once. This requirement is dealt with by snapshot hyperspectral imaging solutions, which use filters organized in a mosaic or tiled configuration, and where each tile is responsible for sensing one narrow band of the spectrum for the entire scene. However, such cameras lack linescan’s image resolution. Snapscan combines the best of both worlds, capturing high-resolution, full hyperspectral images in seconds, making it suitable for use in domains like digital microscopy for pathology and cytogenetics, medical imaging for endoscopy, wound diagnostics and guided surgery.

How it works

Snapscan combines the high-resolution capabilities of linescan sensors (up to 2,048×3,652×150 in spectral range 475 to 900nm) with the convenience of a snapshot camera – with a sensor moving behind the lens using a piezo-electric translation stage. This enables a controlled scanning of the lens image field without moving the object or requiring external camera movement. Thus, even objects that cannot be placed on a translation stage (e.g. an outdoor scene or a patient’s brain) can still be scanned. Flat signal-to-noise ratios of 200 over the full spectral range have already been demonstrated thanks to software features optimizing the reconstruction and correction of hyperspectral data cubes. Scanning takes less than two seconds. If necessary, image registration can be applied to correct small movement artifacts from the imaged target. Since the sensor board is light (<25g), a piezo-stage can easily achieve the necessary level of precision.

Seiten: 1 2Auf einer Seite lesen

Thematik: Allgemein
IMEC vzw
www.imec-int.com

Das könnte Sie auch Interessieren

Anzeige

Vorfreude auf Control 2022

Vorfreude auf Control 2022

Vom 03. bis 06. Mai 2022 wird die 34. Control – Internationale Fachmesse für Qualitätssicherung – in Stuttgart stattfinden.

EMVA Webinar mit Continental Teves

EMVA Webinar mit Continental Teves

Das nächste EMVA Spotlight Webinar findet am Donnerstag, den 9. Dezember, ab 16:00 Uhr (CET) statt. Nuria Garrido López (Continental Teves AG) wird über ‚Änderungen und Lösungen für die optische End-of-Line-Inspektion in der Automobilindustrie‘ sprechen.

EMVA Young Professional Award 2022

EMVA Young Professional Award 2022

Der EMVA Young Professional Award wird auf der 20. EMVA Business Conference 2022 vergeben, die vom 12. bis 14. Mai in Brüssel, Belgien, stattfindet.

Video: EMVA Vision Pitches – Robot Vision

Video: EMVA Vision Pitches – Robot Vision

Teil der inVISION Days 2021 Konferenz waren die EMVA Vision Pitches, bei der sich interessante Unternehmen aus der Bildverarbeitung mit einem kurzen zehn-Minuten-Pitch vorgestellt haben.

Neues Beiratsmitglied für TriEye

Neues Beiratsmitglied für TriEye

Das israelische Startup-Unternehmen TriEye hat Hans Rijns (Bild), eine Führungskraft aus der Halbleiterbranche mit über 25 Jahren internationaler Erfahrung in den Bereichen F&E-Management, Innovation und Geschäftsstrategie, in seinen Beirat aufgenommen.

Vision-Branche auf starkem Kurs

Vision-Branche auf starkem Kurs

Mehr als 1,5 Jahre nach dem Ausbruch der Corona-Pandemie befindet sich der Industrial Technology Index nach einer Stabilisierung auf einem anhaltend hohen Niveau.

Lattice übernimmt Miramterix

Lattice übernimmt Miramterix

Lattice Semiconductor hat Mirametrix, Inc. übernommen, ein Softwareunternehmen, das sich auf fortschrittliche KI-Lösungen für Computer-Vision-Anwendungen spezialisiert hat.

Bild: Alteia
Bild: Alteia
15 Millionen Euro Finanzierung für Alteia

15 Millionen Euro Finanzierung für Alteia

Die Europäische Investitionsbank (EIB) und das in Toulouse ansässige Startup Alteia, das sich auf die Entwicklung von Software für künstliche Intelligenz spezialisiert hat, haben die Unterzeichnung einer Finanzierungsvereinbarung über 15Mio.€ bekannt gegeben.

Micro-Epsilon erweitert Vertriebsteam

Micro-Epsilon erweitert Vertriebsteam

Micro-Epsilon hat sein Vertriebsteam verstärkt. Seit Oktober unterstützen Marcus Gluth (Bild) in den Bereichen Weg- und Abstandssensoren, berührungslose IR-Temperatursensoren sowie Farbsensoren und Jens Höppner im Bereich 3D-Sensoren und Laser-Scanner den Außendienst des Unternehmens.

Anzeige

Anzeige

Anzeige

Anzeige

Anzeige

Anzeige